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Mushrooms
 

Pictured above; A selection of apples

 
 
 
 

A mushroom is an above ground fruiting body (that is spore-producing structure) of a fungus, having a shaft and a cap; and by extension, the entire fungus producing the fruiting body of such appearance, the former consisting of a network (called the mycelium) of filaments or hyphae. In a much broader sense, mushroom is applied to any visible fungus, or especially the fruiting body of any fungus. The technical term for the spore-producing structure of "true" mushrooms is the basidiocarp.

Identifying mushrooms requires a basic understanding of their macroscopic structure. A "typical" mushroom consists of a cap or pileus supported on a stem or stipe. Both can have a variety of shapes and be ornamented in various ways. The underside of the cap (in agarics) is fitted with gills or lamellae where the actual spores are produced. How the gills are attached is another important characteristic used in identification. In the boletes, the gills are replaced by small openings called pores. Bracket fungi essentially lack a stipe, and the cap is attached like a bracket to the substratum, usually a log or tree trunk. Some bracket fungi have gills, others have pores.

In general, identification to genus can be accomplished in the field using a local mushroom guide. Identification to species requires more work. Realize that a mushroom develops from a young bud into a mature structure and only the latter can provide certain identification of the species. Examination of mature spores, or at least knowing their color, is often essential. And to this end, a common method used to assist in identification is the spore print.

There are thousands of regularly harvested edible fungi in the world, in addition to literally hundreds of thousands of other edible species. Some species are highly priced because they cannot be cultivated and are often harvested from natural settings.

 
Feature Ingredients
Apple
Bamboo
Cabbage
Chillies
Garlic
Ginger
Grape
Leek
Lemon
Mushroom
Onion
Pear
Soy Sauce
Squash
more
Feature Recipes
Bang Bang Chicken
Honey Chilli Chicken
Lemon Chicken
Garlic Chicken
Szechuan Chicken
Beef with Noodles
Chinese Fried Rice
Quick Facts
Chopsticks
Chinese Chopsticks taper to a rounded end, Japanese taper to a pointed end and Korean taper to a blunted end.
Chopsticks are traditionally held in the right hand only, and in East Asia, as in Muslim nations, the left hand is used in the toilet.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

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