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Fennel
 

Pictured above; Fennel

 
 
 
 

Fennel, common name for a perennial plant, characterized chiefly by its aromatic leaves and fruits (often referred to as "seeds").

Fennel grows from about 61 to 122 cm (about 24 to 48 in) in height and has small yellow flowers. Native to southern Europe and Asia, fennel is cultivated in the United States, Great Britain, and temperate Eurasia.

All parts of the plant are aromatic and used in flavoring with the blanched shoots used like a vegetable. Another variety, called variously Florence fennel, sweet fennel, Italian fennel, or Cretan fennel, is cultivated in southern Europe. The bases of the leafstalks of Florence fennel are greatly enlarged and form a bulbous structure, which is bleached by earthing and then eaten raw or cooked.

Fennel is popular for meat dishes, but even more so for fish and seafood; its sweet taste also harmonizes with the earthy aroma of bread and gives pickles or vinegar a special flavor. Many Mediterranean, Arabic, Iranian, Indian or even Central European dishes require a small dosage of fennel Of the European countries, it is most known and used in France.


 


 


 
Feature Ingredients
Cardamom
Cinnamon
Cloves
Coriander
Cumin
Fennel
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Ginger
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Nutmeg
Onion
Peanut
Pepper
Turmeric
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Quick Facts
Chopsticks
Chinese Chopsticks taper to a rounded end, Japanese taper to a pointed end and Korean taper to a blunted end.
Chopsticks are traditionally held in the right hand only, and in East Asia, as in Muslim nations, the left hand is used in the toilet.
 
 
 
 
 

 

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